Bride with Afro and Floral Crown

Celebrating #AfroApril with these Bridal Looks

It’s #AfroApril y’all! I’ve been waiting all much to set my hair free and I’m so excited that the time is finally here! Though it was not my plan, I began my 3rd transition back to natural hair shortly before our wedding. Despite a few dedicated years of not cutting my hair for the wedding I didn’t know I was having, about 5 months into planning it started to fall out. *sad face*  I ended up having to cut what was left from my back up to my ears. #BUMMER

I did the big chop a few months before I took my bridal portraits on our one year anniversary and settled on an assisted updo that was similar look to my original wedding look. But these brides! Wedding dresses and puffs on fleek. I’m so happy to see more brides choosing to rock their big hair on their big day. So let’s kick off this celebration of #AfroApril with some pics of lovely brides willing to let it all hang out!

 

First up, from the feature image is Atlanta photographer Bri McDaniel seen below with her hubby. Not only did I love her hair, but she chose to rock a floral crown AND a sparkly gold wedding dress. Isn’t she gorgeous??

 

Bride 3

Photo by Michelle Scott Photography

 

I stumbled across this lovely Ethiopian bride on Offbeat Bride. Swing by and check out the original post. She actually changed her hair by adding some traditional braids for the reception.

 

 

Bride with Afro and Floral Crown

Photo by From the Hip Photography

 

 

 

The images from this beach wedding featured on Chic Brown Bride were beautiful. I remember when I first saw them, I was all smiles. “Look at her hair!” The elegant pearl comb made the perfect accent.

 

Natural Hair Bride with Afro

Photo By Shoreshotz Phototography

 

 

This bride’s crown was accented with a delicate crown of it’s own. I know it’s styled, but her smile is authentic. I just couldn’t pass it up.

 

 

 

Bride with an Afro

Photo by Sawyer Baird

 

BONUS: This fro’d out flower girl has maxed out the cuteness meter with her wedding day style. She’s been on the internet so much, I couldn’t find an original source. #shesfamous

 

Flower Girl with Afro

 

 

So let’s hear it. What do you think of these looks? Would you rock a fro on your wedding day?

 

 

$200 Wedding Shared on Twitter Sparks Discussion on Marriage and Finance

We all know the internet really isn’t a safe space for anybody. You’re ridiculed for what you do. You’re ridiculed for what you don’t. As with all things, you can’t please all the people all the time…or any of the time for that matter.

 

Despite this knowledge, there are some things that just grind my gears. I saw this post on Facebook earlier today:

 

I think this is cute. I don’t have a problem with it. Get married how you like and be sure to get a great picture of guests throwing petals while y’all walk down the aisle. Do you. What I do have a problem with are the comments that suggest that this marriage (or any other that doesn’t include a comma) will last because they didn’t spend a lot of money or because the couple chose not to go into debt over a marriage.

 

Let’s get a few things straight:

  • Everybody who plans a BIG fancy wedding ain’t broke. A $10,000 wedding isn’t going to put everybody in debt. The same is true for a $50,000 wedding. And though the tides may be changing with more couples footing the bill for their own big day, that is not always the case. You don’t know how this wedding is being financed. It’s not your business and it’s not your problem.
  • Everybody planning a small or less fancy wedding ain’t broke. Some people just don’t want all that. They may enjoy intimate events (like myself). They may prefer to go on a lavish honeymoon instead. Just because they want to spend less on a wedding doesn’t mean they are doing it because they are smart or responsible. They may not be saving for a house. They may not be focusing on minimizing debt. Maybe they just don’t want a BIG fancy wedding. It may be hard to believe, but it’s true.

 

Most people are unaware or just strategically forget that the majority of wedding spending is done on the reception (the celebration) not the ceremony (the marriage).

 

 

The+Ultimate+Budget+Guide+|+WeddingWire+SPRINGBOOK+2014:

Proof. About 13% of the budget is solely for the enjoyment/use of the bride and groom.

 

 

Large venue to accommodate two families and friends? For the guests. The choice of two meats and a vegetarian option? That’s for the guests. Open bar? The newlyweds may not even have time to drink. That’s for the guests. Programs? Favors? Invites? All for the guest. Granted the couple may have made selections based on their personal tastes, because a good host/ess goes above and beyond to create a nice experience for their guests, but make no mistake about it, the majority of the money spent on weddings is to ensure that the guests have a wonderful experience.

 

 

Bottom line, y’all have got to stop criticizing  people for how they choose to celebrate their marriage (with you). You can’t judge one couple for hosting the party of the century while simultaneously making fun of another couple for making a more fiscally responsible choice by getting married in the projects apartment courtyard. If that’s too much of a task, stop being a part of the problem. The next time you get a fancy invitation in the mail, don’t even bother getting excited or commenting on the hand written address, the texture of the paper, or the beautifully coordinated envelope liner. Do not be swayed by the luxurious event venue or the promise of a steak and lobster dinner at no charge to you. Promptly remove the RSVP card, select no, and mail it back. By choosing not to attend, you’ll be saving the couple an average of $200 and according to some of you, maybe even their marriage. Matter of fact, when you see the announcement, don’t even send your address. Say congrats, send a gift, and call it a day. If that’s not something you’re willing to do, then maybe you need to reevaluate your issues with expenses, because clearly it is not a concern when it comes to what you’ll be receiving.